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  • Background
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  • Overview
  • Lesson Preview
  • Teaching Materials
  • Background
  • Learning Standards
  • Feedback
  • Acknowledgments
  • Version Notes
English (US)

SciJourneys

How to Build Resilience in Science

How to Build Resilience in Science
Sponsored by:
Galactic_PolyMath_First_Sec_Mobile_Info
The Gist:

Help students sharpen their skills of inquiry and critical thinking and see that science is all around them! This student-centered, active learning unit helps students build resilience and growth mindsets as they approach scientific methods. Features 3 early career scientists!

Target Subject:
Science
Grades:
6-8
Estimated Time:
3 x 45min classes
Target Subject:
Science
Grades:
6-8
Estimated Time:
3 x 45min classes
Subject breakdown by standard alignments:Subject breakdown by standard alignments
Subject breakdown by standard alignments
Subject breakdown by standard alignments

Driving Question(s):

  1. Understand that how science works is diverse, dynamic, and requires resilience.
  2. Practices and approaches that scientists take are not distinct from, and often draw upon, skills cultivated through arts and humanities

Hook(s):

Students will build question webs, draw comics, create hypotheses, and plan studies, all based on their own interests. Supported by videos that feature exciting new research, crafted specifically to interact with this learning experience.

Keywords:
identityselfinterdisciplinaryempowerconnectionscientific method
For Lesson 1
How to Ask Better Science Questions

Indigenous ethnobotanist Rose Bear Don’t Walk demonstrates how scientists generate complex webs of higher-level questions.

by Galactic Polymath
For Lesson 2
How to create hypotheses? A biomechanical engineer explains

MIT-based biomechanical engineer Dr. Ritu Raman talks about hypotheses as a way of expressing curiosity about the world.

by Galactic Polymath
  • How to Ask Better Science Questions
  • How to create hypotheses? A biomechanical engineer explains

3 x 45 min

Available Grade Bands

Available Teaching Environments

indigenous science
Learning Objectives

Students will able to...

  1. Practice forming and sharing higher-level, scientific questions.

  2. Build questioning capacity through learning about the story and scientific work of ethnobotanist Rose Bear Don't Walk.

  3. Understand several challenges in asking higher-level, scientific questions.

  4. Reflect upon their own challenges and triumphs when asking questions in science.

Materials for Grades 6-8
  1. Teacher Worksheet (Lesson 1)

    Print 1

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  2. Student Worksheet (Lesson 1)

    Print 1 Per Student

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  3. Worksheet (Lesson 1)

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Steps & Flow

5 min: Engage

1.

Crafting Questions: Round 1 (Individual)

1.

Crafting Questions: Round 1 (Individual)

To begin the lesson, students spend a few minutes individually writing down as many questions that they can related to an image of a wild rose.

10 min: Explore

2.

Asking Questions with an Ethnobotanist

2.

Asking Questions with an Ethnobotanist

Students watch a video that introduces them to Rose Bear Don't Walk; an ethnobotanist who loves asking questions!

  • Ethnobotany: the study of people's relationships with food plants.

5 min: Elaborate

3.

Crafting Questions: Round 2 (Small Group)

3.

Crafting Questions: Round 2 (Small Group)

In small groups, students spend a few minutes writing down higher-level questions about an image of a huckleberry.

After round 2, students will likely realize that working in teams and building upon Rose's work made it easier to form higher-level questions.

  • Higher-level questions: questions that are specific, creative, exciting, testable, interesting, novel, fascinating.

5 min: Elaborate

4.

Question Web Challenge

4.

Question Web Challenge

Each student starts by writing a question that they are genuinely curious about, then they pass their worksheet to the left. They will add an additional question that builds upon the previous person's question, creating a question web.

5 min: Evaluate

5.

Navigating Challenges

5.

Navigating Challenges

Students listen to what challenged Rose as a young scientist and what she learned along the way.

5 min: Evaluate

6.

Villains of Question-Asking

6.

Villains of Question-Asking

Students identify challenges with question-asking by coming up with descriptions for "villains".

10 min: Evaluate

7.

Map your question-asking journey!

7.

Map your question-asking journey!

Students reflect upon their journey in asking questions, filled with unique challenges and triumphs.

Going Further

Ideas and resources for deepening learning on this topic.

  1. Ethnobotany: Challenges and Future Perspectives

    Have students dive into the science of ethnobotany by reading this short scientific review article.

  2. Well grounded: Indigenous Peoples' knowledge, ethnobiology and sustainability

    Another great introductory paper about ethnobotany/ethnobiology.

  3. Recovering our Roots: The Importance of Salish Ethnobotanical Knowledge and Traditional Food Systems to Community Wellbeing on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana

    Students can dive into Rose's Master's thesis paper!

Materials for Grades 6-8
  1. Worksheet (Lesson 2)

    lesson_tile
Steps & Flow

Connection to Research

To break open the steps of the traditional scientific method, students will follow in the footsteps of young, accomplished women scientists across a broad range of disciplines, including ethnobotany, biomechanical engineering, and cryoseismology. By exploring the diverse paths these scientists have navigated, students will gain a richer, more nuanced understanding of what science entails and also challenge preconceived notions of who can be a scientist.

Research Background

The scientific method is typically taught in science classrooms as a series of content-stripped steps that can guide students’ inquiry. However, teaching science as a journey by following in scientists’ footsteps emphasizes the dynamic and diverse nature of scientific inquiry. This approach allows students to understand that science is not a linear process and that scientists grapple with challenges, setbacks, and unexpected findings. By acknowledging the difficulties inherent in scientific inquiry, students will develop strategies to overcome these challenges and build resilience. This perspective encourages deeper engagement with scientific processes and fosters a more realistic and inspiring view of what it means to be a scientist.

Further Reading:

Scientific Articles

  • Butler, L. P. (2020). The empirical child? A framework for investigating the development of scientific habits of mind. Child Development Perspectives, 14(1), 34-40. (link)
  • Tang, X., Coffey, J. E., Elby, A., & Levin, D. M. (2010). The scientific method and scientific inquiry: Tensions in teaching and learning. Science education, 94(1), 29-47. (link)
Learning Standards Chart

This Galactic Polymath Learning Chart illustrates the areas of knowledge covered. This lesson targets Science, but it helps teach national learning standards in 4 subjects:

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Target Standard(s)

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Connected Standard(s)

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Dimension: Science & Engineering Practices

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Dimension: Peace and Prosperity

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Dimension: Self Awareness and Self Management

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Dimension: Social Awareness and Relationships

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Please let us know how it went with your class!

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Major Release Beta

0.2.0 Lesson 1 alpha posted

May 2, 2024

0.1.0 Unit initialized

October 05, 2023